These Prizes Were No Gems

It’s exciting news — the caller says you’ve won a new car, a boat, jewelry, a fabulous vacation, or a cash prize. All you need to do is buy some vitamins — for $300 to $500 — to claim it.

But this “promotion” from American Health Associates is really just the latest scheme from a repeat scammer, the FTC says. A scheme that’s now been stopped, thanks to the FTC.

People who paid got nothing but vitamins or were sent “prizes” like cheap costume jewelry or lithographs worth a lot less than what they had paid.

So how can you tell if a prize or sweepstakes is the real deal? For one, you shouldn’t have to buy or pay anything to win. In fact, telemarketers are legally required to tell you that. For more on spotting a phony prize promotion, read Prize Offers.

 

Blog Topic: 
Scam Alerts

Comments

these robo calls are out of control. Another thing to do if you revieve one of these calls is to google the number or check one of the many reporting sites like http://www.ruscammer.com to see if someone has reported the number as a possible scammer.

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