Taking Health Care Scams Off the Market

Starting October 1, people will have new ways to buy health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. As opening day approaches, the media will no doubt carry more stories about the Health Insurance Marketplace, how to enroll, and where to get legitimate help. Now that’s the kind of news you can use.

One other piece of news that’s useful: federal and state agencies are working together to encourage consumers to report scammers who use the Health Insurance Marketplace as bait. And they are working together to investigate the leads they get and ultimately, build successful cases to shut those scammers down. Consumers already have filed related complaints with the FTC: some complaints deal with scam artists who are playing the “hurry up” card, allegedly trying to hustle people into revealing their personal information to get a new Medicare card. Other complaints reportedly deal with the sale of worthless medical discount plans. Still others deal with alleged imposters who claim to be “from the government,” asking people to verify their Social Security or bank account numbers.

The FTC, the nation’s consumer protection agency, just held a meeting to talk about how consumers can recognize frauds that play off the Health Insurance Marketplace and where to report them. You can read all about it here. To learn about your health care options and where to find legitimate local people in the know, go to www.healthcare.gov

 

Leave a Comment

Comment Policy

This is a moderated blog; we review all comments before they are posted.  We expect participants to treat each other and the bloggers with respect.  We will not post comments that do not comply with our comment policy.  If a submitted comment includes a link to a commercial website, we will delete the link and post the comment. We won't edit comments except to remove links.

We won’t post:

  • spam or off-topic comments
  • comments that contain vulgar language, personal attacks, or offensive terms that target specific groups
  • sales pitches or promotions
  • comments that contain clearly misleading or false information
  • comments that contain personal information, like home addresses

Comments submitted to this blog become part of the public domain. To protect your privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personal information. Also, do not use this blog to report fraud; instead, file a complaint.

If you have questions about the commenting policy, please contact us.

Read Our Privacy Act Statement

It is your choice whether to submit a comment. If you do, you must create a
user name, or we will not post your comment. The Federal Trade Commission Act
authorizes this information collection for purposes of managing online
comments. Comments and user names are part of the Federal Trade Commission’s
(FTC) public records system, and user names also are part of the FTC’s computer
user records system. We may routinely use these records as described in the
FTC’s Privacy Act system notices. For more information on how the FTC handles
information that we collect, please read our privacy policy.