Resolving Identity Theft? How to Help

FTC staff has a proud history of collaborating with legal services and victims’ rights groups, sharing legal resources and information and training hundreds of advocates throughout the country about a number of important consumer protection issues. Along the way, we’ve gotten many questions about how to help people reduce their risk of identity theft — and how to help them recover from the crime. 

This new video describes two comprehensive FTC resources for dealing with identity theft:

  • Taking Charge has step-by-step instructions that explain what victims should do now, what to do later, and how to track their progress.
  • The Guide for Assisting Identity Theft Victims has tools for advocates to help victims of identity theft who need more support — for example, those who are struggling with uncooperative creditors or credit reporting companies, or those who have language or health challenges.  

Identity theft can ruin a person’s financial status, credit history, and reputation, and at best, can be a real headache to resolve. Whether you’re an identity theft victim yourself — or  advocating for one — these FTC resources can be a big help. Let us know how you’ve used them.

 

Blog Topic: 
Identity Theft
Tags: ID theft

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