Protect Yourself from Buyer’s Remorse

This blog post is part of a series for National Consumer Protection Week

When you buy something it’s hard to know if you’re getting the best deal – and that includes when military families, who are often targets for marketers, are making big financial decisions. Even though some companies might try to take advantage of people, there are things servicemembers can do to make sure they’re getting their money’s worth.

Have you ever bought something online and clicked the box that says “accept” without having any idea of what you’re actually accepting? Or maybe you looked at the fine print but it didn’t make any sense.

Or, you sit in an office with a salesperson who has a stack of paperwork for a product you’re financing. They give you a two-minute explanation of what it all means and ask if you have any questions. You say “no” because it’s embarrassing to say that you didn’t understand what they just said. And when they say “sign here” you do it. Congratulations! You’ve just bought an iPad for… $3,600?!! Read more

 

Comments

I am scared of buying anything from the Internet. I have the unfortunate experience of using my card to top up my mobile telephone. When I saw the receipt I was shocked to discover that it was not for the credit card I used but for a different credit card of the ID Thief who somehow substituted electronically the purchase with my card with the fraudulent credit card. It was this credit card that was used to arrange mortgages of purchases of blocks of flats and streets upon streets properties on my account. This card must have been issued in my name. The dangers are not limited to buying on line, it is everywhere.

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