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How to help the earthquake victims in Nepal

The devastation caused by a massive earthquake in Nepal and the Katmandu Valley region has left many people asking how they can help.

If you’re looking for a way to give, the Federal Trade Commission urges you to do some research to ensure that your donation will go to a reputable organization that will use the money as promised. Continue Reading >

Blog Topic: 
Scam Alerts

Does that weight loss product contain unsafe ingredients?

Look at the label on a bottle of diet pills or another weight loss product. What ingredients do you see? Unfortunately, you might not be seeing the whole picture. Continue Reading >

Blog Topic: 
Health & Safety

Feds call out national mortgage servicer

The Federal Trade Commission and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau don’t play games when it comes to making loan servicers pay for illegal and unscrupulous behavior. Case in point: Green Tree Servicing LLC. Continue Reading >

Feds call out national mortgage servicer

The Federal Trade Commission and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau don’t play games when it comes to making loan servicers pay for illegal and unscrupulous behavior. Case in point: Green Tree Servicing LLC. Continue Reading >

Preparing for spring weather emergencies

After a long, hard winter, aren’t you ready for spring? Baseball, bike rides, barbecuing…but spring also carries with it the risk of severe weather, including dangerous storms, flooding and tornadoes. Here are some tips to help you prepare for a spring weather emergency. Continue Reading >

Blog Topic: 
Your Home

Spring into action with Financial Literacy Month

Spring has finally sprung. And whether you’re shopping for a new lawn mower, a bike, or a gift for a new graduate, a little research can save you a lot of money. Even when you know what you want, it can be overwhelming to choose among dozens of products, brands, retailers and websites.

April is financial literacy month. To help you make smart buying decisions and save more of what you earn, here are a few tips from the FTC.

Step one: Think before you shop. Continue Reading >

Money back guarantee hid another fee

Starting a new business? That used to mean throwing a name on some brick and mortar. Nowadays, you need a website. Lots of companies sell domain names and web hosting services that let customers put up websites. It pays to go with one that spells out all the terms and conditions before you buy. But what if a company promises a refund as part of its 30-day money back guarantee — and then surprises you with a nonrefundable fee? That’s called deception. Continue Reading >

Blog Topic: 
Your Business

The FTC didn’t send that sweepstakes letter

Here’s a scam with an FTC angle. The letter has an official-looking FTC seal and is signed by “FTC Director” Jessica Rich. It says someone at the FTC will help you claim a cash prize you’ve won, and will help ensure delivery. That is, after you pay off the more than $5,000 “Legal Registration Bond.”

The language might sound legal, and the letter might look legit. You might look up Jessica Rich and see she’s an actual FTC official. But the truth is, there’s nothing legal or official about it. It’s a fake letter designed to convince you to send money for a non-existent prize.  Continue Reading >

Blog Topic: 
Scam Alerts

Scammers play name game and get caught

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but sometimes it’s illegal. Just ask the people behind First Time Credit Solutions, who promoted their business as “FTC Credit Solutions” until the real Federal Trade Commission shut them down. The group claimed their credit repair firm was licensed by the FTC, and allegedly took thousands of dollars from people after promising to delete negative, but accurate, information from their credit reports. Continue Reading >

Scammers play name game and get caught

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but sometimes it’s illegal. Just ask the people behind First Time Credit Solutions, who promoted their business as “FTC Credit Solutions” until the real Federal Trade Commission shut them down. The group claimed their credit repair firm was licensed by the FTC, and allegedly took thousands of dollars from people after promising to delete negative, but accurate, information from their credit reports. Continue Reading >

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