Don't Text Back

You get a text message claiming your email account has been hacked. The message asks you to text back in order to reactivate your account. Has your account really been hacked, or is this a scam?

Here’s an example of a spam text making the rounds:

User #25384: Your Gmail profile has been compromised. Text back SENDNOW in order to reactivate your account.

The scammers who sent that message want to take advantage of your computer security concerns in order to get your personal information. If you’ve received a text message like it, here’s what to do:

  • Don’t text back. Legitimate companies won’t ask you to verify your identity through unsecure channels, like text or email.
  • Don’t click on any links within the message. Links can install malware on your device, and take you to spoof sites to try to get your information.
  • Report the message to your cell phone carrier’s spam text reporting number. If you’re an AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint or Bell customer, you can forward the text to 7726 (SPAM) free of charge.
  • File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. Your complaint can help the FTC detect patterns of wrong-doing.
  • Check out our articles on text message spam and computer security for more tips.

Concerned that your email account really has been compromised? Read our article on hacked accounts to learn what you can do to remedy the situation.

 

Blog Topic: 
Scam Alerts, Technology

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