6 Tip-offs to Rip-offs: Don't Fall for Health Fraud Scams

Bogus product! Danger! Health fraud alert!

You’ll never see these warnings on health products, but that’s what you ought to be thinking when you see claims like “miracle cure,” “revolutionary scientific breakthrough,” or “alternative to drugs or surgery.”

Health fraud scams have been around for hundreds of years. The snake oil salesmen of old have morphed into the deceptive, high-tech marketers of today. They prey on people’s desires for easy solutions to difficult health problems—from losing weight to curing serious diseases like cancer.

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a health product is fraudulent if it is deceptively promoted as being effective against a disease or health condition but has not been scientifically proven safe and effective for that purpose.

Scammers promote their products through newspapers, magazines, TV infomercials and cyberspace. You can find health fraud scams in retail stores and on countless websites, in popup ads and spam, and on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Read more

Comments

Be wary of village fairs,business cards with dr.sohen,body adjustments,teamed with another bed side healer.This arrangement may cost your life,a further enhancement of this ages old assault,CON necks with a surgery center to bewitch you and relieve your money,states' health funds,don't

I did not fall for one but several health scams were perpetrated on me. The details are too gruesome to narrate here. The purpose of the scam is to implant my sibling on my account so that the resident ID thief on my account can take complete control. My immediate family are also recruited to facilitate this plan. I am sure they are um aware of the background and the consequences of this scam.

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